Nothing Behind Me, Everything Ahead of Me

“Nothing behind me, everything ahead of me, as is ever so on the road.” - Jack Kerouac, On the Road

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Nothing behind me, everything ahead of me – a fashion editorial of  U+MAG (Mad Men, ISSUE Nº 107)/ Photo: Romain Sellier/ Styling: Viola Galassi/ Styling assistant: Giovanna Giacomin/ Hair styling: Shiori Takahashi/ Make up: Sasha O’Neill/ Model : Greg France @ TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY.

Wood Wood x Champion

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Danish contemporary lifestyle brand Wood Wood has partnered with heritage American sportswear brand Champion in order to release a limited edition collection. The capsule collection for Champion Select line is available in Urban Outfitters stores in the United States and Canada, and in Europe in W.W. stores. This collaboration is part of a bigger project which also features capsule collections from Craig Green and Timo Weiland.

The seven-piece range includes menswear and womenswear, aiming to update the signature sportswear classics. Retaking the iconic pieces such as coach jacket, tennis dress, button-down polo shirt or baseball jersey, the Wood Wood x Champion capsule collection delivers clean solutions for a smart urban wardrobe.

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Performing Fashion

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Paris Opera House ballerina Marie-Agnes Gillot is featured in the editorial of Crash Magazine, December/January issue. Photo: Julien Vallon

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Paul Smith launched his latest innovation for menswear - A Suit to Travel In. A troop of exceptional performers were selected to demonstrate the extraordinary qualities of the suit. Cut from a 100% wool fabric, flexible and breathable, the item provides the wearer with complete freedom of movement.

AMEN

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Bara Prasilova graduated from the Institute of Creative Photography at Silesian University. She lives and works in Prague / Czech Republic. Her visual world consists of imaginary memories of what never happened and explorations of what could have happened if we dropped the habit of drawing our own limits. Her photographs have a characteristic slightly somber and magical atmosphere and humor, which is obvious more or less, depending on specific projects. Her objects are only mediators of the story, the role models. Bara enjoys complicating her job with insisting on real props and objects, sometimes made by her, which could in other cases be easily replaced by Photoshop. She frequently distorts figures of her models. Specifically with their feet positioning she is referring to her childhood ballet era.

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Here ‘s a selection from Bara’s fashion editorial Amen, realized for Proč ne?! magazine .

CREDITS: Petra Vokjan – retouching/ Viola Fetisova – styling/ Regina Soudilova – hair styling/ Renata Zelinkova/L’Oréal Paris – make-up/ Sasha Melnychuk (Bohemia M.), Josef (Clique M.) – models/ Mario Wild Flowers – flower props/ Filip Jandourek – photo assistant/ Matej Tresnak/Kinorama – Profoto rental/ Irena Tesarcikova – production/ images via behance.net

Visible/ Invisible Interplay

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Giovanni AnselmoInvisible, 1971, video projections. Using a slide projector, the word is legible only at a certain point when intersecting  the presence of the viewer. Thus the invisible becomes visible.

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Maison Martin Margiela and their signature ‘invisible’ tag. The blank tag is attached to the garment using 4 white stitches visible from the outside.

Visual Tales

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The New York magazine Visual Tales dedicates a large editorial to a promising young talent - XIMON LEE. His graduation collection this year from Parsons titled  Children of Leningradsky was unanimously acclaimed, gaining enthusiastic reviews everywhere. Recently, Ximon Lee was announced as one of the eight finalists for the H&M Design Award 2015.

Ximon is from Hong Kong but now lives in New York. His diploma collection inspired by the documentary “Children of Leningradsky” approaches menswear design in a very particular way. Taking inspiration from the oversized clothes worn by homeless children in Russian suburbs, he experimented with layered fabrics and exaggerated shapes, exploring the contrast between synthetic and organic textures, between glossy and raw. The outstanding sandwiched pieces in Ximon Lee’s collection are based especially on recycled denim. Working a lot with found materials, he deconstructed and re-patterned many garments from Salvation Army, experimenting various techniques and surface treatments. The result is clean, bold, unisex, global, timeless, emotional. A body of work interesting not just in terms of fabrics and shapes proposed, but also in the way designer chooses to formulate his personal approach to the world of fashion: simple, smart, genuine. Perfect!

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Editorial in New York City magazine Visual Tales / Photographer: Jennifer Livingston / Styling: Haidee Findlay-Levin / Model Jeremy Matos (Red Citizen) /  Featured designs: Ximon Lee / images via thefashionisto.com

 

Rotten Salad

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Originally from Geneva, Kosuke Araki is a Japanese designer living in Tokyo. He studied at Tama Art University Tokio and he also has a MA degree in Design Products from Royal College of Art London. Kosuke Araki interned at Nike and his projects were displayed in various exhibitions. His work covers different areas, questioning the values and sensitivities of our age, dealing with consumerism and the process of rapid modernisation.

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Kosuke Araki – FOOD WASTE WARE -in Kitchen (2013)

With his project Food Waste Ware, Kosuke Araki gives new life to food waste. Food waste is a global problem and Araki puts it in a very personal way. And it’s not only about sustainability. Designer uses food waste from local markets, shops and his own kitchen to create a wide range of tableware – food waste bowls crafted from rotten vegetables, leftover bones and even tea bags. He also delivers a booklet called A New Life for Food Waste that teach us how to replicate the results at home.

These photos show how much food is discarded from food markets, shops or kitchens on a daily basis. Araki asked food shops to put aside some organic waste for him so he went to collected the pieces after the closure. According to one report, even people who believe that their household wasted no food were shown to be discarding 88 kg of avoidable food waste per year. As he says:

“I could imagine that most of us are unaware of the amount of food we throw away, so I took a one-month record of food waste from my kitchen. I am living alone and cook only for dinner, but even so, every week I could have around 1 kg. Every day, food waste is produced at a huge industrial scale as well as a small domestic scale. Although some of it is processed into something useful, most is disposed of in landfills, contributing to environmental problems.”

The idea of Araki’s project was to revive wasted lives by giving them new roles. Designing the set of bowls, he researched alternative ways of reshaping the material trying to avoid the usage of a silicone mould, which is derived from petroleum, and to make all the process done only by natural materials. Aiming to enable users to design their own tableware out of the food waste they produce daily, he also invites the audience to become more aware of the amount of food waste they generate day by day.

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Kosuke Araki – food waste bowls + manual